Will you lay down your life for me?

 

 

Topic:  “Will you lay down your life for me?” Service: 8-9.30am and 10-11.45am
Scripture Texts: Jn 21:15-19 
Speaker: Bishop Robert Solomon
15 When they had finished eating, Jesus said to Simon Peter, Simon son of John, do you truly love me more than these? Yes, 
Lord, he said, you know that I love you. Jesus said, Feed my lambs.
16 Again Jesus said, Simon son of John, do you truly love
me? He answered, Yes, Lord, you know that I love you. Jesus said, Take care of my sheep.
17 The third time he said to him, Simon son of John, do you love me? Peter was hurt because Jesus asked him the third time, Do you love me? He said, Lord, you
know all things; you know that I love you. Jesus said, Feed my sheep.
18 I tell you the truth, when you were younger you dressed
yourself and went where you wanted; but when you are old you will stretch out your hands, and someone else will dress you and
lead you where you do not want to go.
19 Jesus said this to indicate the kind of death by which Peter would glorify God. Then he said to him, Follow me!

Introduction
One call, one question, and one task.

The Call
V 19 - "Follow me." V 22 - "You must follow me."
2 obstacles.

The Question
One question, "Do you love me?"
Bernard of Clairvaux’s four degrees of love.

The Task
Feed my sheep.
Conclusion
Peter’s ministry and martyrdom
One Mission, One Motive, One Ministry

Questions
1. Read John 13:31-38. In what ways can our understanding of what God is doing and our ability to respond to Him become distorted or superficial? How can this affect the depth of our answers to the question of Jesus: “Will you really lay down your life for me?”
2. Why is love for God at the heart of our willingness to lay down our lives for Him (cf Rev. 12:11)? How is this love shown in daily life (cf. John 14:15, 23-24)? Discuss Bernard of Clairvaux’s observation that we must grow from loving self for the sake of self - to loving God for the sake of self - to loving God for the sake of God.
3. How can one lay down one’s life by being a “living sacrifice” in daily life (Rom. 12:1-2)? What modern cultural and social factors and myths serve to hinder such sacrifice and how can we learn to overcome them?